News

29 May 2017

United Kingdom general election, Thursday 8 June 2017

The United Kingdom general election of 2017 is scheduled to take place on Thursday 8 June 2017. Each of the 650 parliamentary constituencies will elect one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons, the lower house of Parliament.

In line with the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011, an election had not been due until 7 May 2020, but a call for a snap election by Prime Minister Theresa May received the necessary two-thirds majority in a 522 to 13 vote in the House of Commons on 19 April 2017.

The Conservative Party, which has governed since 2015 (and as a senior coalition partner from 2010), is defending a majority of 12 against the Labour Party, the official opposition. The third largest party, the Scottish National Party, won 56 of the 59 Scottish constituencies in 2015. The Liberal Democrats, and the Northern Irish Democratic Unionist Party, are the fourth and fifth largest parties, with 9 and 8 seats respectively.

The Conservative Party and the Labour Party have been the two biggest parties since 1922, and have supplied all Prime Ministers since 1935. Both parties have changed their leader since the 2015 election. David Cameron, who had been the leader of the Conservative Party since 2005 and Prime Minister since 2010, was replaced in July 2016 by Theresa May following the referendum on the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union. Jeremy Corbyn replaced Ed Miliband as Leader of the Labour Party and Leader of the Opposition in September 2015 and was re-elected leader in September 2016.

Negotiation positions following Britain's invocation of Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union in March 2017 to leave the EU are expected to feature in the election campaign as well as the normal major issues of the economy, education, jobs and the NHS.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom_general_election,_2017

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia